Diaper threats to a clean environment

Diaper threats to a clean environment

There is nothing that makes matrimonial life complete more than what I am about to mention. Indeed, couples across all races, ethnicities and nationalities would share this sentiment- that the joy of childbearing trounces many others. Having a child as a spouse is like welding a robust bridge that can act as the annex between the two parties, husband and wife socially. Nursing young babies was somewhat a challenge for families especially in the developing world.
Before mothers thought of merry-making at the birth of a child, the proximate turn-off would definitely be circumstances involved in taking care of the baby. Bearing a child meant that one had to prepare the reusable nappies. Many women did this on condition that this was the only way for nursing the young ones. It was not going to take long before disposable diapers came into existence. The diapers came as sudden blessing to women thanks to their ‘pocket-friendly’ price tags. Besides, they have their own conveniences like keeping the baby warm and enjoying the sleep all night.
As populations continue to bulge out and the use of diapers is cementing its place in the society, the world seems to be myopic at the potential dangers accrued to it. The Diaper Bank of Southern Illinois indicates that averagely, infants require a dozen of diapers per day, while toddlers require around 8 units a day. It adds that babies who over stay in soiled diapers risk developing health problems. From this, it is fair enough to deduct that more than 1 billion diapers are dumped each week in the world. This approximation is supported by a revelation by BabyGearLab.com that 90% of US parents use disposable diapers. That babies are comfortable and more secure in diapers is an assertion that is beyond reproach. But it is a practise that the human race needs to be wearisome about.
Fortune that strangles the environment
The use of diapers is widespread and beyond any sort of qualms. Every parent knows that when they have babies or children at tender ages, purchasing the diapers is inevitable. On the flipside, as it appears, few or none at all have been worried about the implications of using diapers. It is the questionable effects that diapers have on the environment when they are disposed that eludes many people. According to the BabyGearLab.com, most disposable diapers are made up of a material known as Super Absorbent Polymer (SAP). The SAP is a substance that is alleged to be taking many years to decompose. The Association of Diaper Services adds that it takes 500 years for a single disposable diaper to disappear in a lump of soil. If this is the case, who can be faulted for the environmental ‘massacre’ that is on-going in many countries and continents, not just US?
Aside from the environmental problem, the modicum of safety of the diapers is still a mysterious affair. Some parents dread of possible diseases such as rashes that may affect their children as a corollary of toxic materials used to make diapers. If the materials that are used to make diapers are toxic; then the fact that they are not biodegradable is intriguing news too.
As the disposable diapers seem to saving the day for mothers, dangers keep piling up. In the US alone, 18 billion disposable diapers were dumped in a single year by 2003, Green American reveals. This number can significantly go a notch higher given the population growth over the past decade. Even though the use of diapers penetrated developing countries late, there is surge in this trend. This translates into massive environmental danger across the globe. What baffles more is the menacing reluctance of various governments in addressing this problem. Currently, the use of green diaper is encouraged. Thanks to the deeply-seated popularity of the disposable diapers; such initiative may not post any positive outcome. What is eminent is that harmful chemicals like SAP continue to damage the soils posing more danger to humanity once they get into the ecosystem.

International airline garbage is recylced in the municpal dum at dandora estate in Nairobi, Kenya.

International airline garbage is recylced in the municpal dum at dandora estate in Nairobi, Kenya.

Join in the discussion

Recent Tweets

We Love This

Kenya Photos